lizcoshow:

a-grue:

lizcoshow defacing signs in the art building ;3

who would just put up pieces of paper in the art building like that, i mean, ANYONE could come along with a pen and do terrible things to them

We’ve got some nice signs in the art building.
It’d be a shame if something were to happen to them.

lizcoshow:

a-grue:

lizcoshow defacing signs in the art building ;3

who would just put up pieces of paper in the art building like that, i mean, ANYONE could come along with a pen and do terrible things to them

We’ve got some nice signs in the art building.

It’d be a shame if something were to happen to them.

clientsfromhell:

Client: I threw out that black pen, it was out of ink.

Me: What black pen?

Client: The one that was lying on your tablet.

Me: You threw out my $150 Wacom pen?

Client: I tried writing with it and it didn’t work. It must’ve been out of ink.

prokopetz:

rattlecat:

shrineheart:

Okay, decided to whip this up because of the following reasons:
1) I get this question a lot. Apparently there are a ton of folks out there that are really new to paypal and while I don’t mind helping, having a good reference page for folks that shows you exactly what to do will cut down the time I spend explaining it.
2) I’ve had two flags on my account in the past year because no one check the “No Shipping Required” box. So Paypal comes to me and says “Hey you didn’t ship our their thing!!!” but I do digital commissions…there’s nothing to ship! So this step is really important!
3) I often have to give out my Paypal email over and over for this and I figured having it in one spot might help!
There will be a new page on my blog with these images and I’ll try to keep them up to date if Paypal happens to change their format! Hope this helps you guys!
(Interested in commissioning me? Check out this page here!)

Putting this on my art blog ‘fo my folks.

These instructions are fine as far as they go, but if your clients are sending you money in the first place, you’re going about it the wrong way.
Here’s the proper way to do it:
In your own Paypal account, next to the “Send Money” tab, you should see a tab that reads either “Request Money” or “Create an Invoice”, depending on what type of account you have (Personal or Business). Click this tab.
On the following page, you’ll see a pair of large buttons reading “Request Money” and “Create an Invoice”. Click the “Create an Invoice” button.
Fill out the invoice form in full, including your business information (with a logo, if you have one; if you don’t, create one), due date, a detailed line-by-line breakdown of the services rendered (don’t forget to expand the “show customisation options” panel to see if there’s anything relevant there), and the full terms and conditions of your arrangement, including the specific terms of delivery (e.g., digital files, mailed sketches, etc.).
Click “Send”.
Doing things this way has a number of principle benefits:
You don’t need to rely upon your client to select the correct options when making their payment. When they receive an invoice, their only choices are to pay it or not pay it.
Your client does not need to have a Paypal account themselves in order to pay an invoice. Paypal offers a number of invoice payment options for non-account-holders.
Assuming you filled out the terms and conditions field completely and correctly, the terms of your arrangement with the client become a matter of record in Paypal’s system. This gives you a large advantage in any subsequent Paypal-mediated dispute, as your client will be unable to misrepresent exactly what you agreed to deliver.
By paying the invoice, your client warrants that they have read, understood, and accepted its terms, which constitutes a legally binding contract in most jurisdictions. This may come in handy if a dispute is escalated by other means.
If you’re claiming your commission fees as self-employment income (which you should be!), a printout of a Paypal invoice will qualify as sufficient documentation for tax purposes in most jurisdictions; a printout of an email chain may not.
TL;DR: Never let your clients use Paypal’s “Send Money” feature. You send them an invoice.
Zoom Info
prokopetz:

rattlecat:

shrineheart:

Okay, decided to whip this up because of the following reasons:
1) I get this question a lot. Apparently there are a ton of folks out there that are really new to paypal and while I don’t mind helping, having a good reference page for folks that shows you exactly what to do will cut down the time I spend explaining it.
2) I’ve had two flags on my account in the past year because no one check the “No Shipping Required” box. So Paypal comes to me and says “Hey you didn’t ship our their thing!!!” but I do digital commissions…there’s nothing to ship! So this step is really important!
3) I often have to give out my Paypal email over and over for this and I figured having it in one spot might help!
There will be a new page on my blog with these images and I’ll try to keep them up to date if Paypal happens to change their format! Hope this helps you guys!
(Interested in commissioning me? Check out this page here!)

Putting this on my art blog ‘fo my folks.

These instructions are fine as far as they go, but if your clients are sending you money in the first place, you’re going about it the wrong way.
Here’s the proper way to do it:
In your own Paypal account, next to the “Send Money” tab, you should see a tab that reads either “Request Money” or “Create an Invoice”, depending on what type of account you have (Personal or Business). Click this tab.
On the following page, you’ll see a pair of large buttons reading “Request Money” and “Create an Invoice”. Click the “Create an Invoice” button.
Fill out the invoice form in full, including your business information (with a logo, if you have one; if you don’t, create one), due date, a detailed line-by-line breakdown of the services rendered (don’t forget to expand the “show customisation options” panel to see if there’s anything relevant there), and the full terms and conditions of your arrangement, including the specific terms of delivery (e.g., digital files, mailed sketches, etc.).
Click “Send”.
Doing things this way has a number of principle benefits:
You don’t need to rely upon your client to select the correct options when making their payment. When they receive an invoice, their only choices are to pay it or not pay it.
Your client does not need to have a Paypal account themselves in order to pay an invoice. Paypal offers a number of invoice payment options for non-account-holders.
Assuming you filled out the terms and conditions field completely and correctly, the terms of your arrangement with the client become a matter of record in Paypal’s system. This gives you a large advantage in any subsequent Paypal-mediated dispute, as your client will be unable to misrepresent exactly what you agreed to deliver.
By paying the invoice, your client warrants that they have read, understood, and accepted its terms, which constitutes a legally binding contract in most jurisdictions. This may come in handy if a dispute is escalated by other means.
If you’re claiming your commission fees as self-employment income (which you should be!), a printout of a Paypal invoice will qualify as sufficient documentation for tax purposes in most jurisdictions; a printout of an email chain may not.
TL;DR: Never let your clients use Paypal’s “Send Money” feature. You send them an invoice.
Zoom Info
prokopetz:

rattlecat:

shrineheart:

Okay, decided to whip this up because of the following reasons:
1) I get this question a lot. Apparently there are a ton of folks out there that are really new to paypal and while I don’t mind helping, having a good reference page for folks that shows you exactly what to do will cut down the time I spend explaining it.
2) I’ve had two flags on my account in the past year because no one check the “No Shipping Required” box. So Paypal comes to me and says “Hey you didn’t ship our their thing!!!” but I do digital commissions…there’s nothing to ship! So this step is really important!
3) I often have to give out my Paypal email over and over for this and I figured having it in one spot might help!
There will be a new page on my blog with these images and I’ll try to keep them up to date if Paypal happens to change their format! Hope this helps you guys!
(Interested in commissioning me? Check out this page here!)

Putting this on my art blog ‘fo my folks.

These instructions are fine as far as they go, but if your clients are sending you money in the first place, you’re going about it the wrong way.
Here’s the proper way to do it:
In your own Paypal account, next to the “Send Money” tab, you should see a tab that reads either “Request Money” or “Create an Invoice”, depending on what type of account you have (Personal or Business). Click this tab.
On the following page, you’ll see a pair of large buttons reading “Request Money” and “Create an Invoice”. Click the “Create an Invoice” button.
Fill out the invoice form in full, including your business information (with a logo, if you have one; if you don’t, create one), due date, a detailed line-by-line breakdown of the services rendered (don’t forget to expand the “show customisation options” panel to see if there’s anything relevant there), and the full terms and conditions of your arrangement, including the specific terms of delivery (e.g., digital files, mailed sketches, etc.).
Click “Send”.
Doing things this way has a number of principle benefits:
You don’t need to rely upon your client to select the correct options when making their payment. When they receive an invoice, their only choices are to pay it or not pay it.
Your client does not need to have a Paypal account themselves in order to pay an invoice. Paypal offers a number of invoice payment options for non-account-holders.
Assuming you filled out the terms and conditions field completely and correctly, the terms of your arrangement with the client become a matter of record in Paypal’s system. This gives you a large advantage in any subsequent Paypal-mediated dispute, as your client will be unable to misrepresent exactly what you agreed to deliver.
By paying the invoice, your client warrants that they have read, understood, and accepted its terms, which constitutes a legally binding contract in most jurisdictions. This may come in handy if a dispute is escalated by other means.
If you’re claiming your commission fees as self-employment income (which you should be!), a printout of a Paypal invoice will qualify as sufficient documentation for tax purposes in most jurisdictions; a printout of an email chain may not.
TL;DR: Never let your clients use Paypal’s “Send Money” feature. You send them an invoice.
Zoom Info
prokopetz:

rattlecat:

shrineheart:

Okay, decided to whip this up because of the following reasons:
1) I get this question a lot. Apparently there are a ton of folks out there that are really new to paypal and while I don’t mind helping, having a good reference page for folks that shows you exactly what to do will cut down the time I spend explaining it.
2) I’ve had two flags on my account in the past year because no one check the “No Shipping Required” box. So Paypal comes to me and says “Hey you didn’t ship our their thing!!!” but I do digital commissions…there’s nothing to ship! So this step is really important!
3) I often have to give out my Paypal email over and over for this and I figured having it in one spot might help!
There will be a new page on my blog with these images and I’ll try to keep them up to date if Paypal happens to change their format! Hope this helps you guys!
(Interested in commissioning me? Check out this page here!)

Putting this on my art blog ‘fo my folks.

These instructions are fine as far as they go, but if your clients are sending you money in the first place, you’re going about it the wrong way.
Here’s the proper way to do it:
In your own Paypal account, next to the “Send Money” tab, you should see a tab that reads either “Request Money” or “Create an Invoice”, depending on what type of account you have (Personal or Business). Click this tab.
On the following page, you’ll see a pair of large buttons reading “Request Money” and “Create an Invoice”. Click the “Create an Invoice” button.
Fill out the invoice form in full, including your business information (with a logo, if you have one; if you don’t, create one), due date, a detailed line-by-line breakdown of the services rendered (don’t forget to expand the “show customisation options” panel to see if there’s anything relevant there), and the full terms and conditions of your arrangement, including the specific terms of delivery (e.g., digital files, mailed sketches, etc.).
Click “Send”.
Doing things this way has a number of principle benefits:
You don’t need to rely upon your client to select the correct options when making their payment. When they receive an invoice, their only choices are to pay it or not pay it.
Your client does not need to have a Paypal account themselves in order to pay an invoice. Paypal offers a number of invoice payment options for non-account-holders.
Assuming you filled out the terms and conditions field completely and correctly, the terms of your arrangement with the client become a matter of record in Paypal’s system. This gives you a large advantage in any subsequent Paypal-mediated dispute, as your client will be unable to misrepresent exactly what you agreed to deliver.
By paying the invoice, your client warrants that they have read, understood, and accepted its terms, which constitutes a legally binding contract in most jurisdictions. This may come in handy if a dispute is escalated by other means.
If you’re claiming your commission fees as self-employment income (which you should be!), a printout of a Paypal invoice will qualify as sufficient documentation for tax purposes in most jurisdictions; a printout of an email chain may not.
TL;DR: Never let your clients use Paypal’s “Send Money” feature. You send them an invoice.
Zoom Info

prokopetz:

rattlecat:

shrineheart:

Okay, decided to whip this up because of the following reasons:

1) I get this question a lot. Apparently there are a ton of folks out there that are really new to paypal and while I don’t mind helping, having a good reference page for folks that shows you exactly what to do will cut down the time I spend explaining it.

2) I’ve had two flags on my account in the past year because no one check the “No Shipping Required” box. So Paypal comes to me and says “Hey you didn’t ship our their thing!!!” but I do digital commissions…there’s nothing to ship! So this step is really important!

3) I often have to give out my Paypal email over and over for this and I figured having it in one spot might help!

There will be a new page on my blog with these images and I’ll try to keep them up to date if Paypal happens to change their format! Hope this helps you guys!

(Interested in commissioning me? Check out this page here!)

Putting this on my art blog ‘fo my folks.

These instructions are fine as far as they go, but if your clients are sending you money in the first place, you’re going about it the wrong way.

Here’s the proper way to do it:

  1. In your own Paypal account, next to the “Send Money” tab, you should see a tab that reads either “Request Money” or “Create an Invoice”, depending on what type of account you have (Personal or Business). Click this tab.
  2. On the following page, you’ll see a pair of large buttons reading “Request Money” and “Create an Invoice”. Click the “Create an Invoice” button.
  3. Fill out the invoice form in full, including your business information (with a logo, if you have one; if you don’t, create one), due date, a detailed line-by-line breakdown of the services rendered (don’t forget to expand the “show customisation options” panel to see if there’s anything relevant there), and the full terms and conditions of your arrangement, including the specific terms of delivery (e.g., digital files, mailed sketches, etc.).
  4. Click “Send”.

Doing things this way has a number of principle benefits:

  • You don’t need to rely upon your client to select the correct options when making their payment. When they receive an invoice, their only choices are to pay it or not pay it.
  • Your client does not need to have a Paypal account themselves in order to pay an invoice. Paypal offers a number of invoice payment options for non-account-holders.
  • Assuming you filled out the terms and conditions field completely and correctly, the terms of your arrangement with the client become a matter of record in Paypal’s system. This gives you a large advantage in any subsequent Paypal-mediated dispute, as your client will be unable to misrepresent exactly what you agreed to deliver.
  • By paying the invoice, your client warrants that they have read, understood, and accepted its terms, which constitutes a legally binding contract in most jurisdictions. This may come in handy if a dispute is escalated by other means.
  • If you’re claiming your commission fees as self-employment income (which you should be!), a printout of a Paypal invoice will qualify as sufficient documentation for tax purposes in most jurisdictions; a printout of an email chain may not.

TL;DR: Never let your clients use Paypal’s “Send Money” feature. You send them an invoice.

(via tabithadoesart)

tabithadoesart:

Commissions are open
I will only accept payments through PayPal, and only after I have sent you an invoice and you have sent your payment in full will I begin working on your commission. Depending on the complexity of the picture (details and background) the price may be more. We can discuss this in email. Please do not pay until we have discussed your commission and I have sent you an invoice.
Please email me at tabithagrow@gmail.com with your order details: bust/full body, style (penil, pen, shaded pencil, copic), and characters (if OCs, then please provide a description or reference images).
NEW! Copic coffee tumbler inserts! These pieces will actually be shipped to you, the physical originals. Conditions still apply to these pieces, prices do not include shipping.
Zoom Info
tabithadoesart:

Commissions are open
I will only accept payments through PayPal, and only after I have sent you an invoice and you have sent your payment in full will I begin working on your commission. Depending on the complexity of the picture (details and background) the price may be more. We can discuss this in email. Please do not pay until we have discussed your commission and I have sent you an invoice.
Please email me at tabithagrow@gmail.com with your order details: bust/full body, style (penil, pen, shaded pencil, copic), and characters (if OCs, then please provide a description or reference images).
NEW! Copic coffee tumbler inserts! These pieces will actually be shipped to you, the physical originals. Conditions still apply to these pieces, prices do not include shipping.
Zoom Info

tabithadoesart:

Commissions are open

I will only accept payments through PayPal, and only after I have sent you an invoice and you have sent your payment in full will I begin working on your commission. Depending on the complexity of the picture (details and background) the price may be more. We can discuss this in email. Please do not pay until we have discussed your commission and I have sent you an invoice.

Please email me at tabithagrow@gmail.com with your order details: bust/full body, style (penil, pen, shaded pencil, copic), and characters (if OCs, then please provide a description or reference images).

NEW! Copic coffee tumbler inserts! These pieces will actually be shipped to you, the physical originals. Conditions still apply to these pieces, prices do not include shipping.

(via tabithadoesart)